Budgeting IEP Goals

Budgeting is an extremely functional skill for a lot of our students with disabilities. I love working on budgeting starting in middle school. It's a great skill to tie into our Community Based Instruction, and working with money is very motivating for our students!

I have several budgeting units in my store that focus on amounts from $10 to $50. These are great for small groups or one on one instruction, and the themes are so fun for seasonal activities! There are several skills within the units that can be targeted for IEP goals. Below are some ideas to get you started when writing budgeting IEP goals for your students.

Store Navigation:

When provided with a shopping list with 5 items, student will locate the items and their prices in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 1: When provided with a shopping list, with 2 items, student will locate the items and their prices in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 2: When provided with a shopping list, with 3 items, student will locate the items and their prices in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 3: When provided with a shopping list, with 4 items, student will locate the items and their prices in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
 


Addition:

Given 2 prices written in decimal form, student will correctly add the prices together to determine the total for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 1: Given 2 whole dollar prices written in decimal form ($4.00, $3.00, etc), student will correctly add the prices together to determine the total for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 2: Given 2 prices with dollars and cents written in decimal form ($4.32, $3.58, etc), student will correctly add the prices together to determine the total for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
 

Comparison:

Given 2 prices written in decimal form and a number line, student will correctly determine which item costs more in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 1: Given 2 whole dollar prices written in decimal form ($4.00, $3.00, etc), student will correctly determine which item costs more in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 2: Given 2 prices with dollars and cents written in decimal form ($4.32, $3.58, etc), student will correctly determine which item costs more in a simulation or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 opportunities across 3 consecutive data sessions.

Budgeting:

Given an assortment of bills and the written price of an item up to $50, the student will identify whether they have enough money to make the purchase and correctly make the purchase in a simulated or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 trials across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 1: Given an assortment of $1 bills and the written price of an item up to $50, the student will identify whether they have enough money to make the purchase and correctly make the purchase in a simulated or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 trials across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 2: Given an assortment of $1, $5 and $10 bills and the written price of an item up to $50, the student will identify whether they have enough money to make the purchase and correctly make the purchase in a simulated or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 trials across 3 consecutive data sessions.
  • Objective 3: Given an assortment of $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills and the written price of an item up to $50, the student will identify whether they have enough money to make the purchase and correctly make the purchase in a simulated or real life scenario for 4 out of 5 trials across 3 consecutive data sessions.


Provided with a pre-determined budget, student will develop a shopping list, add prices together, determine if he has enough money to make a purchase, and make a purchase in a simulated or real life situation for 4 out of 5 opportunities.
  • Objective 1: Provided with a pre-determined budget up to $30, student will develop a shopping list, add prices together, determine if he has enough money to make a purchase, and make a purchase in a simulated or real life situation for 4 out of 5 opportunities.
  • Objective 2: Provided with a pre-determined budget up to $40, student will develop a shopping list, add prices together, determine if he has enough money to make a purchase, and make a purchase in a simulated or real life situation for 4 out of 5 opportunities.
  • Objective 3: Provided with a pre-determined budget up to $50, student will develop a shopping list, add prices together, determine if he has enough money to make a purchase, and make a purchase in a simulated or real life situation for 4 out of 5 opportunities.


If you are ready to get started with budgeting in your special education classroom, make sure to check out these functional budgeting units in my store. Start with the freebie to see if it's a good fit for your students. 


Christmas Boutique Budgeting Unit (up to $75) COMING SOON
Hardware Store Budgeting Unit (up to $100) COMING SOON

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